Chronic angina pectoris

Who suffers from chronic angina pectoris?

As a result of the increase in life expectancy, there is a growing population of patients suffering from angina pectoris which is resistant to treatment. These patients often suffer from a widespread obstructive coronary disease, sometimes following bypass surgery and multiple catheterization procedures, who are not candidates for further intervention

Data collected in Europe and the United States show that more than 8% of patients referred to catheterization due to angina pectoris cannot be treated by therapeutic catheterization or bypass surgery

One in four patients who have undergone successful therapeutic catheterization or successful coronary bypass surgery will continue to have angina pectoris despite the “successful” treatment they have received

Opening the blocked arteries in the heart by therapeutic catheterization or bypass surgery is effective in reducing angina pectoris only in about 75% of cases. Many angina patients have had catheterization or bypass surgery in the past, and still suffer from angina pectoris

To accurately diagnose the severity of angina pectoris, click here

Grade the degree of severity of your angina pectoris

Angina that appears only when performing physical activity with considerable strain (climbing stairs or fast walking) or extreme cases of mental pressure / stressful situations

Angina that appears during moderate physical activity (difficulty climbing stairs of more than one floor or fast walking). This angina may also appear during mental pressure / stressful situations

Angina that appears during basic physical activity with only minimal strain (difficulty walking more than 10 meters continuously, difficulty climbing stairs of more than one floor or fast walking)

Angina that appears during minimal strain, such as a short walk in on a plane, and sometimes also during rest

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%
of patients referred to catheterization due to angina pectoris cannot be treated by catheterization or bypass surger
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%
of cardiac catheterizations or bypass surgeries are not effective in reducing angina pectoris
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One in four patients who have undergone catheterization or coronary bypass surgery will continue to have angina pectoris despite the “successful” treatment they have received

Diagnosis of angina pectoris is done by in-depth questioning about the severity and frequency of the symptoms and upon receipt of medical history and information about the patient's lifestyle

Contact us to diagnose and improve your daily functioning